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Friday, January 28, 2011

You never know what's gonna come live at our farm!

We volunteered today to foster a sheep today that was found tied to a electric pole in a neighboring town.


The lady that called the animal control office had lost her dog's collar and tags up on a river bank and a week later got a message on her phone that some workers for the local electric company had found "her sheep" with the collar on and tied him to a pole in a town 30 miles from where she had lost the collar. She picked him up with the collar, but doesn't want sheep and needed a place for him.


Someone saw him in my truck after I picked him up and said that they had almost hit him running on the main road in that town a month ago. It's a strange situation. If someone calls in the next two weeks, he'll go back to them. If not, I have to decide if I want him or not. At first I didn't get a good look, didn't feel any "equipment" and assumed he was a she and I was excited. After realizing that he's a wether, I am not sure. We have two Suffolk ewes we breed for our daughter's 4-H project. I'm not a spinner, weaver or knitter, but if his wool will pay for his keep, he's cute enough and sweet enough that he can hang out here. I'm sure he's a fiber breed, but no idea what kind. Any ideas?

He has a bad rope burn that I'm gonna doctor up. I'm thinking a tetanus vaccine and a dose of penicillin plus some antibiotic ointment. He's not very old (I'm going to check his teeth when we doctor him tonight) and doesn't weigh much more than maybe 90 lbs, and that's pushing it.

I love surprises like this, and the best part was, my hubby heard it on the radio and told me to go get him. Maybe I've got him hooked on animals too!

9 comments:

  1. I would love to have gotten him. And I would not return that sheep to someone who has let the poor guy run wild on a major road. I do not understand people sometimes.

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  2. From the photos and the weight you describe, he sure looks like he could be a Shetland! I assume he has a small size to go with the weight? Does he have a naturally short tail, or is it docked? I think it's kismet; you are meant to learn to felt or spin and knit! ;-)

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  3. So happy you are giving him a place to heal and feel safe. I think he might just have found his forever home. LOL

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  4. He sure is cute! Glad he found a good home at least for now. Sweet. Blessings jane

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  5. He is small, shorter than my yearling Suffolk. Looking at his teeth, I'm guessing he's a yearling. The rope burn was pretty bad actually, had to cut off some dried up skin. It didn't smell infected, but I gave him a tetanus shot and penicillin just in case and I put on some antibiotic cream and iodine and wrapped the leg loosely to keep the wound clean. He is bedded down for the night in a small pen by my mini-horse and ewes.

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  6. I would keep him :) His story is too much to let go. I would check in with some local spinners maybe on Craigslist or a local shop if you have one and see if they want the wool. Also, when I was a kid we had spinners in 4-H, do you have any 4-H kids around that would want to help with the whole process from shear to spin? We had a "worthless male" growing up on our sheep farm, but dad let us keep him around since he followed us kids around like a dog or goat, he was pretty cute and pet-like LOL much to dad's dismay :)

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  7. You are such a good person! And I am sure he will be very happy in his new home :)

    Hope he's all yours!

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  8. Sad to hear an animal has been treated that way. Glad he's some place safe.

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  9. Blessings to you for giving this little guy a warm, safe, good place to be. Hope it works out that he can stay with you.

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